Canadian Sheep Identification Program

 

 

Strategic Plan

 

2006 to 2010

 

 

 


Table of Contents

 

Executive Summary. 3

Introduction. 5

The Program.. 5

Confidentiality. 6

Program Changes. 7

Liability and Responsibility. 7

Enforcement 8

Driving Force. 8

Methodology. 11

Results. 12

Vision. 15

Mission Statement 15

Key Strategic Directions. 16

Premises identification. 16

Animal Identification. 17

Performance Indicators. 20

Financial Management 21

Advocacy and Lobbying. 21

Managing Change. 22

Appendix I 24

New Tag Requirements. 24

Appendix III 26

Tactical Plan. 26

Appendix IV – 2005-2006 CSIP Budget 28

 


Executive Summary

 

Administered by the Canadian Sheep Federation (CSF), the Canadian Sheep Identification Program (CSIP) was launched on January 1, 2004. The program was designed to address producer concerns about sheep health, while also being affordable, simple, practical and reliable.

 

The CSF approved a limited number of tags in order to ensure that tag prices are lower and if applied as recommended, the tags will meet the Program’s requirements for retention, readability and ability to withstand tampering.

 

The program requires sheep producers (outside of Quebec) to tag all animals leaving the farm of origin with a pink Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tag.

 

Producers from provinces that have their check-off attached to the sale of tags (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nova Scotia) are required to purchase their tags directly from the Canadian Cooperative Wool Growers (CCWG).  While producers in British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island, do not pay their check off at the time of tag purchase, they still buy their tags from the CCWG or Ketchum Manufacturing directly. Ontario sheep producers have an additional option of purchasing tags from a local co-op that is registered to sell Ketchum tags.

 

While Quebec sheep producers, are to tag their animals with both an Allflex electronic tag and a dangle tag that they purchase through Agri-Tracabilite Quebec (ATQ).  Their animals must be tagged 30 days following birth or before leaving the farm, whichever comes first. Tags must also be activated and ATQ must be provided with the date of the animal’s birth, its sex, tag number and premise identification number.

 

In addition to having to tag their animals, producers are:

 

1.                                          Required to record the movement of all animals over the age of 18 months leaving their flock; other than those sold directly to a federally or provincially inspected abattoir.

2.                                          Required to record the movement of all sheep entering their flock for breeding purposes.      

3.                                          Tag imported sheep with a CSIP tag within seven days of arrival. For Quebec producers, the animals must be tagged on arrival at the farm or before importation. In Quebec, all animals must be tagged with an Allflex dangle tag and an Allflex RFID tag; both of which are approved for use by the CSF for producers outside of Quebec as well.

4.                                          Replace lost tags immediately with a new CSIP ear tag and the identification number recorded with as much information about the origin of the animal as is known.

 

CSIP ear tags are not to be removed from a live animal or tampered with for any reason and must not be re-used. If an animal dies on-farm, the tag should be removed, saved and the cause of death recorded, if known.

 

Record keeping for Quebec producers is more intensive as they must notify ATQ for receiving animals:

 

1.                    Within Quebec (45 days following reception or before leaving the farm whichever comes first)

2.                    From another Canadian province (45 days following reception or before leaving the farm, whichever comes first)

3.                    From outside Canada (30 days following reception).

 

And for moving animals off the farm:

 

1.                  To go within Quebec (45 days following departure)

2.                  To go to another Canadian province (45 days following departure)

3.                  To go to another country (30 days following departure).

 

 

The CSIP is a program which is dynamic in nature and, as such, can be expected to evolve as producer and industry needs do. The CSF, however, does believe that when changes are being made to the program in response to government and/or public desires, that the financial responsibility of such changes should not be borne solely by producers. 


Introduction

 

Administered by the Canadian Sheep Federation (CSF), the Canadian Sheep Identification Program (CSIP) was launched on January 1, 2004. The program was designed to address producer concerns about sheep health and meet consumer expectations for quality assurance and food safety. In addition, the program was designed to be affordable, simple, practical and reliable.

 

The Canadian Sheep Federation (CSF) approved a limited number of tags in order to ensure that tag prices are lower and if applied as recommended, the tags will meet the Program’s requirements for retention, readability and be tamper evident.

 

With the implementation of the CSIP, Canada became a world leader in individual sheep identification.

 

The Program

 

The program requires sheep producers (outside of Quebec) to tag all animals leaving the farm of origin with an official CSIP tag.

 

Producers from provinces that have their attached their check-off to the sale of tags (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nova Scotia) are required to purchase their tags directly from the Canadian Cooperative Wool Growers (CCWG).  While producers in British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island, do not pay their check off at the time of tag purchase, they still buy their tags from the CCWG or Ketchum Manufacturing directly. Ontario sheep producers have an additional option of purchasing tags from a local co-op that is registered to sell Ketchum tags.

 

While Quebec sheep producers, are to tag their animals with both an Allflex electronic tag and a dangle tag that they purchase through Agri-Tracabilite Quebec (ATQ).  Their animals must be tagged 30 days following birth or before leaving the farm, whichever comes first.

 

In addition to having to tag their animals, producers are:

 

§         Required to record the movement of all animals over the age of 18 months leaving their flock; other than those sold directly to a federally or provincially inspected abattoir.

§         Required to record the movement of all sheep entering their flock for breeding purposes.          

§         Tag imported sheep with a CSIP tag within seven days of arrival. For Quebec producers, the animals must be tagged on arrival at the farm or before importation.

§         Replace lost tags immediately with a new CSIP ear tag and the identification number recorded with as much information about the origin of the animal as is known.

 

CSIP ear tags are not to be removed from a live animal or tampered with for any reason and must not be re-used. If an animal dies on-farm, the tag should be removed, saved and the cause of death recorded, if known.

 

Record keeping for Quebec producers is more intensive as they must notify ATQ for receiving animals:

 

§         Within Quebec (45 days following reception or before leaving the farm whichever comes first)

§         From another Canadian province (45 days following reception or before leaving the farm, whichever comes first)

§         From outside Canada (30 days following reception).

 

And for moving animals off the farm:

 

§         To go within Quebec (45 days following departure)

§         To go to another Canadian province (45 days following departure)

§         To go to another country (30 days following departure).

 

The Canadian Sheep Federation (CSF) approved a limited number of tags in order to ensure that tag prices are lower and if applied as recommended, the tags will meet the Program’s requirements for retention, readability and ability to indicate tampering.

 

The CSIP is governed by the federal Health of Animals Act. The program is mandatory and is enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Monetary penalties will be implemented for non-compliance.

 

Confidentiality

 

Tag numbers and farm of origin information that is provided by producers when the tags are purchased, are entered into a central database maintained by the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA). The information is kept confidential and can only be accessed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the CSF in the event of a health or safety issue involving an animal. Using this information and the records maintained by producers, CFIA will trace the movement of the animal from the flock of origin to its last location to determine the source of the concern.

Program Changes

 

Additional tagging options were made available for sheep producers on January 1, 2005. The CSF is committed to ensuring that the CSIP will evolve with the changing needs of producers and the industry. As such, producers outside the province of Quebec were given the option of tagging their animals with one of the following:

 

§         The Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tag (pink);

§         An Allflex dangle tag (pink);

§         An Allflex RFID tag (yellow) with a Ketchum tag (pink) or;

§         An Allflex RFID tag with its corresponding dangle tag (both yellow).

 

These options were made available to producers to satisfy the tagging requirements for animals entering the province of Quebec, in that they must have an RFID tag and also because some producers were dissatisfied with the performance of the Ketchum tags.  Some of the concerns expressed by the producers were:

 

§         Ear infections at the site of the tag

§         The 9-digit number is hard to read and, therefore, the tag functions as a transport tag and not a management tag

§         The pink colour seems to be wearing off of the tags

 

 

Liability and Responsibility

 

Producers are responsible for tagging sheep and lambs before the animals leave their premises and will be held accountable if they fail to do so.

 

Producers will not automatically be held accountable for a health or food safety problem discovered in an animal that originated from their flock. Beginning with the flock of origin and the last location of the animal, CFIA will trace from both points to identify the source of a problem and take appropriate action. As in the past, CFIA will rely on scientific information and tests to confirm infection and toxin sources.

 

By using individual identification, the number of flocks needing to be quarantined and tested will decrease by an estimated ninety per cent. This means less inconvenience for producers and a faster and more economical resolution of the problem.

 

 

Enforcement

 

The CFIA is responsible for the enforcement of the CSIP, in accordance with its responsibilities under the Health of Animals Act and Regulations.

 

Where non-compliance exists, the CFIA has the authority to issue administrative monetary penalties which for ID violations is $500 per violation, or $250 if paid within 15 days.

 

Prosecution is also an enforcement option. The CFIA reserves the right to proceed with a prosecution under the Health of Animals Act if, for example, the case involves significant risk to the health and safety of sheep or the public, or in cases of flagrant non-compliance or fraud.

 

CFIA inspectors routinely inspect production and marketing sites for disease control, humane transport and trade certification purposes.

 

Producers are required to keep records of all sheep and lambs entering their farm for breeding purposes and all sheep 18 months and older leaving their farm to a destination other than a provincially or federally inspected abattoir.

Driving Force

 

There are various forces driving the Canadian sheep industry in the development, implementation and continuous evolution of its sheep identification program. One of the stronger driving forces is the need to be able to quickly trace the movement of an animal in the event of a Foreign Animal Disease outbreak. By doing so, the industry can control the spread of disease.

 

A national identification program is also essential in the development and implementation of disease eradication programs; such as the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program and the National Genotyping Program.

 

The CSIP, as it is currently structured, is meeting the demands of Canadian sheep producers.

 

There is also the influence of other commodities impacting the nature of the CSIP. While the Canadian sheep industry is not export dependent, the ability of the industry to trace and track its animals may impact the ability of other commodities to export their product.

 

Livestock industries in other countries are developing comprehensive, integrated traceability systems that are increasing the pressure on Canadian livestock commodities to implement complimentary systems. It is imperative then, that the Canadian sheep industry’s identification program continue to develop so that it does not lag behind putting the industry in the position where it is pressured into a system that is not appropriate for its needs and/or capabilities.

 

Since the announcement of a BSE positive cow in 2003, there has been an increase interest in animal identification and the ability to trace and track animal movements.

 

The livestock industry in Canada has also seen the development of organizations such as the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA), the Canadian Livestock Identification Agency (CLIA), Agri-Tracabilitié Québec (ATQ) and Can-Trace that are working on issues related to animal identification, tracking and tracing right through the supply chain.

 

In 2003, the signing of the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) signaled the importance federal and provincial governments place on traceability and solidified program funding for national agriculture and food industry organizations to continue to advance traceability.  In 2003, Can-Trace and in 2005, the Canadian Livestock Identification Agency (CLIA) were created.

 

In 2005, the federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments formally recognized the unique opportunity to use traceability information systems for many applications, the benefits derived from traceability both for public and private good and the importance of a coordinated industry-government approach by creating an FPT Traceability Task Force (TTT).  Providing advice and recommendations to the FPT Policy Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) for their consideration and endorsement prior to review and commitment from the FPT Deputy Ministers (DMs) and Ministers, the FPT TTT has been charged with identifying government needs and articulating a vision for a National Agriculture and Food Traceability System, starting first with livestock and poultry.

 

At their meeting in June 2006, FPT Ministers again emphasized the need to move forward on traceability and proposed the creation of an Industry-Government Advisory Committee (IGAC).

 

In 2006, the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Agricultural Ministers established a Traceability Task Team to try and develop a traceability model for Canada.  This task has developed a list of deficiencies in terms of their view of a national traceability model.

 

The sheep industry has responded to the list of deficiencies, but does recognize that the over the long-term the industry will need to respond to the government’s needs and their performance outcomes.

 

It should be noted that within these needs, each species groups will have the flexibility to determine how they will meet the performance outcomes.

 

At this time, the CSF is undergoing a review of its CSIP program as questions have arisen regarding:

 

§         The effectiveness of the Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tags in terms of management, ability to retain its colour (pink)

§         Ear infections resulting from the use of the Ketchum Kurl-Lock tag

§         The ability of the processing plants to transfer the nine digit animal identification number to the carcass during processing

§         How much longer the Ketchum Kurl-Lock tags will be the official CSIP tags

§         Whether or not RFID tags will become mandatory at some point for all producers

§         Whether or not the CSF will be able to create one national ID program for all provinces

§         Producer requests to find cost effective alternatives to the present tag and tagging system

§         A need to age verify animals for export

§          

Animal Identification.

§         Identifiers must be retired within:

o       48  hours by abattoirs

o       7  days of carcass disposal

o       7  days of export

§         Animals birth date must be accurate to year of birth

§         Knowing the gender of individually and uniquely identified animals

§         Be able to link animal movements to premises when animals are not individually identified.

Animal Movement

  • Need history of movements of individual animal or group of animals over its/their lifetime
  • [At least 99 % of] animals are traceable  on demand
  • [At least 99 %] of animals can be located on demand
  • All conveyances have a unique number
  • [At least 99%] of conveyance identifications are accurately reported

 

According to the implementation timelines suggested by the CLIA, because the ovine sector is already individually identifying animals, then it follows that by:

 

2006

  • There is the launch of registration of Premises and registration of Premises managers
  • Implementation of identification at “birth” programs are completed

 

2007

  • Complete registration of Premises and premises Managers
  • Launch animal movement reporting

 

2008

  • Full implementation of reporting animal movement events

 

2009

  • Voluntary compliance fully operational

Methodology

 

The initial review, conducted in the summer of 2005, was intended to develop a set of recommendations for the development of a comprehensive strategic management model for the Canadian Sheep Identification Program. To this end, a consultation process was undertaken in which a survey was distributed to the Canadian Sheep Federation’s Board of Directors, the provincial sheep organizations, the Canadian Sheep Breeders’ Association and the Canadian Cooperative Wool Growers.

 

While some provincial organizations returned the survey as a unit (x2), others circulated the survey to their memberships. In total 24 surveys were returned via e-mail and fax.

 

The CSF’s National ID Committee, which is comprised of the Executive Committee and the Canadian Sheep Breeders Association representative met in Ottawa over the course of two days to discuss the results of the survey and to develop a rough draft of the strategic management model.

 

To help the Committee develop the model, they were provided with the following:

 

§         A summary of sheep identification programs in Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, the United States, Ireland and the European Community

§         The survey results

§         A review of the work being done by CanTrace, the CLIA, the CCIA and ATQ

§         A presentation by the CFIA

§         An update of national ID Programs for other livestock groups

 

Once the rough draft of the model was completed, it was circulated to the remaining members of the CSF Board and the provincial associations for feedback.

 

The final draft of the Strategic Plan for the CSIP, was officially presented to the Board of Directors at the Annual General Meeting in Ottawa in 2005; after which the activities officially commenced.             

 

 

Results

 

Due to the fact that provincial organizations and other individual producers circulated the survey it is difficult to know how many copies were distributed. However, 24 surveys were returned.

 

The majority of respondents believe that a national identification program is in place:

 

§         So that the industry can retrace animal movements in order to identify the source of a disease

§         For eliminating food safety problems

§         To meet the requirements of the CFIA regulations

§         To ensure that Canadian lamb is not restricted from export

 

The respondents seem to be split as to whether or not they are comfortable with the current CSIP program. While nine respondents answered “yes”; eight said “yes” but added qualifiers and seven respondents said “no”.

 

Those that were pleased with the program indicated that it was simple, easy to administer and that there seemed to be reasonably good compliance. It was also noted that the current arrangement of tag distribution with the Canadian Cooperative Wool Growers was working well.

 

The identified problems with the CSIP program as it is currently, included:

 

§         The program will probably not be good enough to meet requirements in five years

§         It takes too long to trace an animal

§         Concerns regarding the ability to enforce the program

§         Concerns regarding the confidentiality of the information

§         Dissatisfaction with the current tags (hard to read, infected ears)

§         No assurance that the animal identification stays with the carcass

§         Believe that all provinces should have the same identification system

§         The program is too labour intensive too the larger flocks

§         The use of alternative (RFID) tags is too cost prohibitive

 

When asked whether what they wanted to get out of national identification system, the top responses from the industry were:

 

§         To meet government regulations

§         For tags to contribute to sheep management decisions; as long as an RFID system is relatively inexpensive and user friendly (e.g., genetic improvement)

§         Traceability for “gate to plate” marketing

§         Minimum paper work to meet export obligations

§         Government support and promotion of the program

§         Nothing

 

Other responses included: the need to reduce the number of tags used, there should be one tag for management and traceability; the need to incorporate RFID technology; economical and viable; and compliance with trading partners

 

In terms of where they thought the CSIP program would be in five years the frequent responses included:

 

§         More tag options including RFID

§         Retired tag numbers

§         Tags that can be used for management and traceability (including databases, genetic improvement, date of birth, flock location, health status)

 

The responses were often cushioned between thoughts that the producers would be “forced” into more complicated and expensive identification programs.

 

In order to move the CSIP program from where it is today to where the respondents think it will be in five years it was strongly believed that the sheep industry would be “forced” into using RFID tags by larger commodity groups, through a “top-down process”. Some, however, felt that if we could demonstrate the tangible benefits to RFID tags and could secure government funding, the move to RFID tags would be possible.

 

When asked what an effective identification system looked like respondents said:

 

§         Electronic, providing a number of opportunities for improved, efficient management from breeding through feeding through marketing

§         Retirement of tag numbers

§         The current program

§         Simple, inexpensive, universal, enforced

 

The identified priority areas for the CSF in terns of the CSIP were:

 

§         Communication – informing producers of all the opportunities and impacts of a national ID system on their management

§         Implementing electronic ID

§         Keeping the program affordable; perhaps even income generating for producers

§         Ensuring the program is monitored effectively

 

The survey also asked respondents to identify other issues and/or concerns that they had. One of the biggest concerns for producers was the cost of making changes to the national identification system that was above and beyond what the industry currently has. In fact, some even went as far as to indicate that the current program is too expensive.

 

There is a consensus amongst respondents that because national identification is a public good, much of the funding of any changes to the program should be supported by public funds.

 

Given the current climate, with other programs such as On-Farm Food Safety, Environmental Farm Plans, and Nutrient Management Plans, producers are feeling overwhelmed with the increasing cost and regulations associated with farming.  

 

For a complete listing of all responses to the survey please see Appendix XX

 

The discussions in Ottawa indicated that animal identification and traceability is enjoying high visibility at the ministerial levels; which translates into potential funding dollars for traceability and identification projects.

 

As the National ID working group discussed the results of the survey additional suggestions were made:

 

§         Development of a yearly CSIP report card, which would include the number of trace backs per year, compliance rates, number of times the database was accessed et cetera;

§         It is premature at this point to set a date by which Ketchum tags will no longer be acceptable; the CSF should wait until there is an affordable tag available;

§         To ensure that money is coming back to consumers for the implementation of programs like the CSIP, branded lamb products need to be developed, and markets need to be expanded; this would require partnerships with packers;

§         The border opening would be an incentive for producers to acquire means other than dentition for age verification;

§         Start building the infrastructure before making the RFID tags mandatory;

§         Need a year round supply of lamb to ensure premium price incentives from abattoir;

§         The sheep industry does not have the mass numbers to bring down the costs of RFID tags;

§         Genetics could be a driving force; being able to pick out good carcasses at the abattoir and then tracing back its genetics to identify good breeding stocks;

§         One of the industry’s biggest drivers should be that we are driving ourselves

 

Additional questions that were not answered in the circulated questionnaire, but the working group felt should be asked, included:

 

§         What is the effective cost that farmers are willing to accept?

§         Would they accept a higher tag cost if there was a guaranteed return on investment?

§         Could the sheep industry enter into an agreement with a tagging company and cattle to bring the costs down? Or perhaps with the U.S. and Mexican sheep industries?

§         Does the Haines report from Ontario indicate that RFID tags will become mandatory? If so, since Ontario and Quebec represent 60% of the slaughter industry, will the other provinces be put in a position where they just have to comply with Ontario and Quebec?

§         What is the market accessibility afforded to the beef industry by assuring sheep are tagged?

§         Is there a middle ground between where we are now and RFID?  Is this middle ground affordable?

Vision

 

The CSF will be a visionary organization, with active membership and will be the voice of Canadian sheep producers at a national and international level. The CSF will develop a reputation for being a tireless advocate for Canadian sheep producers.

 

Mission Statement

 

To endeavour to work closely and cooperatively with all levels of government and industry related organizations, ensuring that producer and industry needs for animal identification, tracing and tracking are met, while the program remains affordable, simple, practical and reliable.

 

Advocacy

 

The CSF is committed to advocacy on behalf of the Canadian sheep industry by identifying, monitoring and evaluating present and long-term national identification needs.

 

Collaboration

 

The CSF will build collaborative relationships both within and outside the Canadian sheep industry so that it is able to work effectively and efficiently on behalf of the Canadian sheep industry.  

 

Communication

 

The CSF encourages and promotes open lines of communication between the Federation, provincial and membership organizations, government personnel and international sheep organizations.

 

Community

 

The CSF will foster a sense of community within the sheep industry by encouraging the development of relationships, partnerships and networks among members and stakeholders.

 

Confidential

 

The CSIP will store enough information to allow for officials to be able to trace an animal’s movements and identify any other animals that may have been exposed. All information will be kept confidential.

 

Fiscal responsibility

 

The CSF is accountable to its member organizations in terms of its direction and fiscal resources.

 

Compatibility

 

The CSIP will be based on national standards to ensure that a uniform and compatible system evolves throughout Canada. The program will support all needs of official identification, including animal disease programs, on-farm food safety, inter-provincial, intra-provincial and international trade.

 

Key Strategic Directions

Premises identification

 

Identifying locations where animals are held will aid in the ability of officials to efficiently track animal movements in the event of an animal disease outbreak.

 

The CSF is a board member of the Canadian Livestock Identification Agency.  One of the current projects of the CLIA is the development of the standards for a National Premises Identification program.  Though our industry has not made the commitment to movement tracking it is realized that for both movement tracking and effective trace-back it is necessary to have a location of all farm and livestock handling premises.

 

In 2006, the provincial governments agreed that they will take the lead on premises identification and consult with industry. At this time, some provinces are more ahead of others. What they have identified though as performance outcomes are:

 

§         Premises attributes be accurate, complete and updated at least annually

§         Data is easily transposable to a geographic information system and to emergency response systems

§         One unique ID# per premises regardless of variety of species or production types present

Animal Identification

 

A standardized animal identification system has been implemented with each animal having a unique identification number. Over the course of the next five years the program will begin its evolution into one where affordable tag alternatives will continue to be investigated. More specifically, the CSF will continue to lobby the federal government and other livestock commodities in an effort to ensure that Canadian sheep producers can be offered an affordable RFID tagging alternative.

 

The CSIP Working Group would like to see the Caisley tag in particular, investigated as an alternative to the current tagging options.

 

 

2006

§         Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tags available to all sheep producers outside of Quebec as the official CSIP tag

§         Allflex RFID and dangle tags available to producers not interested in using the Ketchum tags and/or those shipping animals into Quebec

§         Quebec sheep producers using Allflex RFID and dangle tags

§         Results from Quebec tag trial made available

§         CSF to continue investigating the cost of other tagging options including RFID tags, DNA tags DNA/RFID tags

§         CSF to enter into discussions with ATQ on how to merge the identification programs

§         CSF and CFIA to assess the effectiveness of the promotional material to processing plants – is the animal ID carrying through to the carcass

§         CSF to establish the administrative costs of retiring tags and determine if this is deemed to be an important and necessary part of the CSIP

§         CSF to investigate the notion of partnering with the American and Mexican Sheep Industries in terms of a common identification system

§         Complete the economic impact of not using RFID tags in sheep on other commodities

§         Develop a proposed template for animal livestock groups to share the cost of animal identification

§         Begin to lobby other commodities on the idea of sharing the cost of animal identification

§         Continue to lobby the federal government; animal identification is a public good

§         Continue to work with the CFIA to ensure that the CSIP program is being enforced and that audits are being conducted

§         Report card issued; evaluation of the success of the current Strategic Plan; changes made as required

§         The CSF will continue to work with the CLIA in the development of new standards as they affect the livestock industry

           

2007

§         Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tags available to all sheep producers outside of Quebec as the official CSIP tag

§         Allflex RFID and dangle tags available to producers not interested in using the Ketchum tags and/or those shipping animals into Quebec

§         Quebec sheep producers using Allflex RFID and dangle tags

§         Results from Quebec tag trial made available

§         Continue to work with the CFIA to ensure that the CSIP program is being enforced and that audits are being conducted

§         Continue to lobby other commodity groups on the concept of sharing the costs of animal identification

§         Continue to lobby the federal government; animal identification is a public good

§         CSF to enter into negotiations with a tag manufacturer to have RFID tags made available to Canadian sheep producers by 2009

§         CSF to begin development of communication material on the upcoming availability of DNA/RFID and/or RFID tags and the benefits of using these tags

§         Infrastructure established to merge all animal identification information from ATQ and CCIA

§         Report card issued; evaluation of the success of the current Strategic Plan; changes made as required

§         Continued work with the CLIA on National Standards

§         Investigate the option of group lot identification for the sheep industry (e.g., lambs going directly to slaughter, ewes being moved to pasture)

§         Begin communicating with producers on the need of reporting the export of breeding stock to the database

§         Begin working with the Federal and provincial governments and abattoirs on determining a cost effective method of retiring tag number of market animals

§         Discuss with producers their option of recording age of animals

§         Work with provinces on the development of premises identification

 

 

 

2008

§         Begin to phase out the Ketchum Kurl Lock #3 tags and the communication strategy needed to ensure producers are aware of the phasing out of the tag

§         DNA/RFID and/or RFID tags made available to all producers

§         Collection and reporting movements of all animals not going directly to slaughter or processing facilities.

§         Allflex RFID and dangle tags available to producers not interested in using the Ketchum tags and/or those shipping animals into Quebec

§         Quebec sheep producers using Allflex RFID and dangle tags

§         Continue to work with the CFIA to ensure that the CSIP program is being enforced and that audits are being conducted

§         Continue to lobby other commodity groups on the concept of sharing the costs of animal identification

§         Continue to lobby the federal government; animal identification is a public good

§         Continue communicating with producers on the need of reporting the export of breeding stock to the database

§         Begin communicating with producers on the need to report the movement of all breeding stock, regardless of destination

§         Begin working with the Federal and provincial governments and abattoirs on determining a cost effective method of retiring tag number of market animals

§         Discuss with producers their option of recording age of animals

§         Work with provinces on the development of premises identification

§         Report card issued; evaluation of the success of the current Strategic Plan; changes made as required

§          Continued work with the CLIA on National Standards

§         Begin to plan for the next five years

 

 

2009

§         New tagging options available to Canadian sheep producers

§         Continue to work with the CFIA to ensure that the CSIP program is being enforced and that audits are being conducted

§         Analysis of the lobbying efforts with other commodity groups; has it been successful

§         Report card issued; evaluation of the success of the current Strategic Plan; changes made as required

§         All producers exporting breeding stock are now recording that movement

§         Continue communicating with producers on the need to report the movement of all breeding stock, regardless of destination

§         Continue working with the Federal and provincial governments and abattoirs on determining a cost effective method of retiring tag number of market animals

§         Continue discussions with producers their option of recording age of animals

§         Work with provinces on the development of premises identification

 

2010

§         New tagging options available to Canadian sheep producers

§         Continue to work with the CFIA to ensure that the CSIP program is being enforced and that audits are being conducted

§         Report card issued; evaluation of the success of the current Strategic Plan; changes made as required

§         All producers exporting breeding stock are now recording that movement

§         Continue communicating with producers on the need to report the movement of all breeding stock, regardless of destination

§         Continue working with the Federal and provincial governments and abattoirs on determining a cost effective method of retiring tag number of market animals

§         Continue discussions with producers their option of recording age of animals

§         Work with provinces on the development of premises identification

 

Performance Indicators

 

 

1.                  Testing of the system to ensure the accurate recording of numbers

2.                  Annual reports (or testing) on the number of times the identification database is accessed for food safety and/or animal disease trace outs

3.                  Annual reports on the number of times the identification database is accessed due to lost lambs

4.                  Annual compliance reports from CFIA

 

Financial Management

 

The CSF will continue to collect an administration fee on tag sales, in order to ensure that the financial resources are available to continue developing the CSIP program. The current fee is $0.10 per tag and is reviewed annually at the CSF AGM and this amount will be reviewed annually at the AGM.

 

The following recommendations are being made to ensure that all business associated with the CSIP is conducted in a financially prudent manner:

 

 

§         Establish, review, and adhere to clear guidelines for spending the CSIP funds

 

§         Review the CSF budget and ensure that the budget reflects the strategic priorities

 

§         Review financial statements monthly and compare actual results to Budget projectio

 

§         All Board and staff expense claims related to the CSIP are to be approved by the Vice-Chair (or appointed official)

 

§         Engage a qualified, independent auditor to prepare audited financial statements for the CSF which are to be made available at the Annual General Meeting

 

Advocacy and Lobbying

 

Advocacy and government relations have been identified as a key priority of the CSF, particularly since having public funds contribute to funding the CSIP has been identified as a need.  The result is an increased producer need for a strong national voice speaking on their behalf at various government policy tables.

 

§         Stimulate new opportunities for the sheep industry, develop new partnerships, and promote and protect the interests of producers and other industry partners

 

§         Co-operate and collaborate with industry partners including suppliers, processors, retailers, Governments, research institutes others

 

§         Build strong collaborative relationships with other agricultural commodity organizations, and governments in Canada

 

§         Communication with Government, the general public on the financial stress to which the sheep industry are currently exposed and the need to have the CSIP program funded through Government dollars

 

§         Remain current on all policies and legislation of the Canadian government that may impact the CSIP and ensure that industry responses are submitted to the government in a timely fashion for issues that are of concern, or issues that are supported

 

§         Develop strong working and collaborative relationships with sheep organizations in other countries; primarily the United States and Mexico.

 

§         Build strong working relationship with CFIA ensuring that the program is being enforced

 

Managing Change

 

Assuming the CSF adopts the recommendations made in this report, the Federation will have to effectively and efficiently communicate the changes to the industry stakeholders; primarily the member organizations and producers. This can be done by using the communication vehicles outlined in this report and through one-on-one interaction between the Executive Director of the CSF and the General Managers of the member associations.

 

In addition, the Board of Directors will play a vital role in ensuring the boards of the member organizations are aware of the changes that the CSIP  is undergoing and building support. With the Board of Directors exercising leadership through this change process, resistance at the membership level may be avoided.

 

It is recommended that implementation of the strategic plan begin immediately, and while it is not anticipated to interfere significantly with the current daily operations of the CSF, an adjustment period will be required as both staff and Board members become familiar with their new roles.

 

It is vital that member organization staff are reassured that while the CSF staff is assuming more responsibilities and encouraging greater communication, their roles and responsibilities are not be infringed upon. Individuals from the member organizations are also encouraged to provide the CSF with feedback to ensure that their needs are being met and that the CSF is building confidence and support through the implementation of this strategy.

 

The implementation of this strategy and its effectiveness should be reviewed at the next (and subsequent) Annual General Meeting and changes be made to ensure that the Canadian Sheep Federation continues to meet and exceed its members expectations.


Appendix I

 

New Tag Requirements

 

 

1.                  Animals going directly to slaughter are to be tagged with a Ketchum Kurl-Lock #3 tag

2.                  RFID tags will be subjected to field trials and assessed for readability.

3.                  All trials, unless otherwise specified, will be coordinated and conducted under the supervision of the CSF

4.                  Acceptable results will be determined by the CSF and may be subject to change at its discretion

5.                  CSF may waive the field trial if the tag has been approved by a national identification

6.                  Breeding stock (or animals where producers can easily recover the cost of a more expensive tagging option) should be tagged with a DNA/RFID or a RFID tag

7.                  Encoded data within the RFID tag must be printed on the front facing, exposed portion of the tag.

8.                  Tags must have the National ID logo (maple leaf with a “CA”) located on the front facing, exposed portion of the tag

9.                  There should be no apparently physical deterioration in tags due to (but not limited to) ultraviolet radiation, rain, heat, cold or other environmental influences within three years of installation

10.             Manufacturers are expected to do the necessary research on tag materials to ensure tag integrity

11.             Tags are to be designed for single use and be tamper-evident

12.             Tags must be able to retain their pink colouring

13.             The retention rate is subject to change at the discretion of the CSF.

14.             Unless otherwise specified, all tag trials will be coordinated and conducted under the supervision of the CSF

15.             ISO standards (11784-5) must be met

 

Reader Requirements

 

1.                  For mobile readers, important requirements include mobility, versatility and ruggedness

2.                  ISO standards (11784-5) must be met

3.                  Readers will be subjected to field trials and assessed for readability.

4.                  All trials, unless otherwise specified, will be coordinated and conducted under the supervision of the CSF

5.                  Acceptable results will be determined by the CSF and may be subject to change at its discretion

6.                  Readers must be capable of reading FDX transponders

7.                  Stationary RFID readers must be capable of reading all CSF approved RFID tags at a minimum distance of 75 cm.

8.                  All readers must be capable of communicating to an external device using the technology supplied with the reader or that is readily available trough local retailers

9.                  The reader manufacturer and/or supplier must provide access to suitable software that allows the data to be easily downloaded from the reader to a computer

10.             Readers should have a numeric display capable of showing the transponder identification code

11.             Readers should provide an audible and/or visible indication that a transponder has been successfully read, and a different audible and/or visual indication that a transponder has not been read.

12.             Readers should be shock and water resistant and should meet the operating temperature, humidity, and other environmental requirements expected of the intended application

 

 

 


Appendix III

Tactical Plan

 

Action

Occurrence

Lead

Resources Needed

Estimated Time Requirement

Performance Indicators

Financial Management

Expense claim approval policy

Ongoing

Vice Chair

Vice Chair

Variable

All Director and staff claims to be approved by Vice-Chair

Draft budgets for upcoming fiscal year

Yearly

ED

ED, Board review

Two weeks ED /Board time

Draft budget prepared before year-end and circulated for Board review

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

Review of monthly newsletter  (From the Flock) mandate, circulation and format

Ongoing

ED

ED, Chair, Staff

3 days per year

Mandate developed, reviews documented and completed quarterly, publication responsive to readership needs

The Bulletin

Monthly

ED

ED

1/2 day per issue

Sent out after each Board meeting

Website – updating

Ongoing

ED

ED/Staff

4 days per month

Website updated regularly with information regarding programs, policies, news releases

Advertisement Development

Ongoing

ED

ED

2 days per month

2 ads per year placed in all provincial and national magazines and newsletters

Brochure Development (including promotional material for processing plants)

Yearly

ED

Staff

5 days

Brochure printed yearly providing mission statement, programs available through CSF and CSF’s value

Response policy for provincial/producer concerns

Ongoing

Chair/ED

Board

Variable

Response to expressed concerns provided within 14 days with indication of process for further action if required

Develop and update state of the program reports

Yearly

ED

ED, government personnel, provincial staff

5 days of staff time plus government and provincial staff time

Reports updated annually, information provided at AGM and in brochure format

Development and implementation of an on-line discussion forum

Immediately

ED

ED, Board, Provincial staff

Variable

Launching of discussion forum

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advocacy

Address government and public concerns related to National Identification, Food Safety, Animal Health

Ongoing

ED/Board

ED/Staff/Board

Variable – depending on concern expressed

Legislation monitored, consultation with provincial organizations and timely responses issues given

Advocate for Federal support for national identification

Ongoing

ED

ED/Staff/Board

3 days per month

Financial support provided for producers, cost of tags and readers covered

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amalgamating the ATQ program with the CSIP program

 

 

 

 

 

Discussions with ATQ on common elements of both programs and what can be easily merged

Monthly

ED/ ID Committee members

ED/ ID Committee members

2 days per month

Amalgamated programs


Appendix IV – 2006-2007 CSIP Budget

Revenue

 

 

 

 

Administration Fees

$48,080

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXPENSES

 

 

 

 

Administration

$2,200

CCIA database fee

 

Bank Charges

$150.00

 

 

Insurance

$1,000.00

BOD Insurance

 

Internet

$650.00

Office internet access, communication, advocacy

 

Meetings

$6,000.00

Advocacy, communication

 

Office

$1,200.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

Postage

$500.00

Communication, advocacy

 

Professional Services

$3,400.00

Legal fees, financial management

 

Rent

$2,000.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

Salaries & Benefits

$24,300.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

Telephone

$3,180.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

Translation

$2,500.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

Website

$1,200.00

Communication, advocacy, planning, financial management

 

 

$48,280

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses over Revenue

($200.00)